Tied or Caged

Woolsy

Basic Member
#1
Which is more humane thing to do when we need to secure a dog, tying it or putting it in a cage? I will always go with cage, if we really need to keep the dog secured. How do we feel when a human suspect is tied up to a pole or a corner?
 
#2
I believe a crate or some type of carrier would definitely be more secure than tying a dog up somewhere. If we make the crate or carrier a place our dogs enjoy being, they won't mind being confined to the crate or carrier for a little bit. We can do this by getting our dogs to associate the crate or carrier with positive things.
 

MeriYa

Basic Member
#3
Both are very restrictive. I would say the cage is more so restrictive, because you can tie a dog to a tether of any length. For transport the cage would be much more secure, although I've seen people tie their dogs to the inside back of an open truck, or not tie them and drive off with the dog not secure... which can lead to very bad results. In a backyard, a large cage can be built that's not so restrictive, so I'd definitely go with the cage if we're talking backyard security.
 

Vinny

Staff member
#4
I believe a crate or some type of carrier would definitely be more secure than tying a dog up somewhere. If we make the crate or carrier a place our dogs enjoy being, they won't mind being confined to the crate or carrier for a little bit. We can do this by getting our dogs to associate the crate or carrier with positive things.

I agree 100% As long as the dog is taught (desensitized) to be calm and feel safe is most important and will be humane. We always try to keep/teach our dogs as calm as possible and feel safe when we have to confine them to keep them safe (eg crate/tether).
 

Ford23

Basic Member
#5
I know a lot of people who can neither tie their dogs nor cage them, because of the belief that doing so would be cruel. Nonetheless, it is possible to crate or kennel-train a dog and achieve the desired result (a sense of security). When I was young, our dogs used to be tied most times during the day and they would be the calmest animals ever. We also made sure that we untied them at specific times and they got used to this. However, one particular dog was very interesting because he would hide whenever he suspected he was going to be tied.
 

Woolsy

Basic Member
#6
Thanks for your input. Is it a good idea to train a dog to go into a crate at a very early age? Specifically, when do we need to train them that getting into a crate is harmless and that it is for their protection?
 

HereSadie

Basic Member
#7
At our shelter, we do neither. The dogs stay in kennels at night, but they're roomy. The beds are elevated as is their food and water. There is room to use the restroom away from the sleeping and eating area. During the day they go outside into one of the fenced in yards to play. We have multiple sections to keep everyone happy and stress-free. There is a city ordinance that prohibits people from tying up dogs. My fear about the crate is that the dogs will get overheated. Also, how do they use the restroom without lying in their waste. That doesn't seem healthy. It would also deter people who are interested in adopting one of the dogs. It's hard to tell temperament when a dog is in a crate and no one wants a filthy pet.
 

Woolsy

Basic Member
#8
You are correct Sadie, but I think the topic has gone the other way. I blame myself for that for not specifying the subject matter.

What I'd like us to discuss is securing the dogs for transport. For example, how stray dogs are transported to shelters.
 
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